[Polymathic] You’re Not Supposed to Love What You Do

If I had a dollar for every time someone told me how lucky I was to be doing what I love…

Look, do what you love, love what you do, follow your passion, all of it is terrible advice. It just is.

We often struggle to figure out if we truly love doing something or we just love the idea of it or the rewards we imagine.

And that’s why it gets tricky.

[Polymathic] This Mental Hack Allows You to Work 12–14 Hours a Day

Did you know that you can deduce how much money someone earns by asking them a simple question?

You can, in fact, deduce a lot about them, about their principles, ethics, dreams, and goals.

What is that question?

Well, it’s simple.

“Do you believe in work-life balance?”

If it takes you less than 10 seconds to have a negative emotional reaction to what I am implying here, stop and think about why.

If you feel the need to say, “Yeah, but…” you should also stop for a minute and ask yourself if life’s a balancing act or not, and if going through life as if walking on tightrope is the only available option.

If you pay close attention to extremely successful people sharing stories about their habits and principles, you’d notice they’re all about the hustle.

Elon Musk once shared a piece of simple advice, “Work like hell.”

The trouble is, most people burn out. Folks end up in the hospital. Some even worse.

[Polymathic] A Simple Framework for Using Your Inner Critic to Your Advantage

For most of my twenties, there were so many things I didn’t want to be true about myself.

I believed I was quite unlovable, which was my excuse for not trying to be worthy of love in any way. I believed I’d always struggle financially, so I made no serious effort to earn more, to save more, or to build multiple streams of income.

I believed that life was harsh, that people didn’t like me for being skinny, kind of ugly, and not nearly as charming as everyone else, so I lived in a state of perpetual fear — I somehow expected the world to decide that I wasn’t worthy of living on this planet anymore and send me off to spend the rest of my life on the dark side of the moon.

All information indicated that I was right: the women in my lifeeither didn’t want to be involved romantically with me or left me after a couple of months. I always struggled to earn enough to pay the bills. I didn’t have that many friends.

Life was a pain. Hell was other people. And I was but a shadow traveling through life at the speed of your average bus, sometimes a cab or an Uber.

It Begins with Me

My environment as a child never lacked any of the basic needs.  We had lean times, but I slept in a bed at night. I was sheltered from weather.  At 14, I ran away and learned a little about what it means to be homeless — but only a little.  I was more uncomfortable than I had ever been in my life, but help was everywhere.  After a week, I returned home.

Twenty or so years later, I learned about homelessness again…