[AoB] The “Secret” to Writing Blockbuster Articles

Tell me if this has ever happened to you: it’s Monday morning, and you’re ready to get some writing done. In your head, you’re already publishing a blockbuster article. The only thing that’s missing is the red carpet.

But then you sit at your desk. That damn blank page reflects the image of a creatively bankrupt blogger; your fingers are stubborn, the muse is shy.

You want to write brilliant articles. But you just can’t…

What’s the secret to being consistent, anyway?

How do you punch the keys, if your mind feels empty?

The truth is, writing is half magic, half strategy.

And today we’re going to have some fun and talk about a secret that allows you to magically sit at your desk and punch those damn keys.

Most bloggers struggle because they approach writing as the act of creating something out of nothing. It’s the main reason you want to bash your head against the keyboard.

In fact, writing the damn thing should be the easiest part of content creation.

Once I realized that you can’t create something out of nothing, I could wake up at 5 AM, have a sip of coffee, and sit down to punch those damn keys until my hands hurt.

No more time wasted staring stupidly into the abyss of a blank document, no more cursing that blinking cursor thing.

[AoB] Should You Go Hyperniche?

We now live in a world of constant information overload. Content creators are sharing millions and millions of articles, podcasts, social media posts, and videos every single month.

This, in turn, changes the dynamic of how we create content, how we distribute it, how we promote it, and even how we monetize our blogs.

The main issue? Broad topics lack focus, direction, and are becoming less and less appealing.

The most lucrative niches are overcrowded and ultra-competitive, and a general blog that tackles a main topic (or a multitude of topics) has little to no chance of standing out from the crowd.

[AoB] How to Get More Comments on Your Blog Posts: The Definitive Guide

It’s kind of frustrating, isn’t it? Having to scroll for a minute and a half through hundreds of comments on some posts just so you can share your opinion.

It’s even more frustrating when your own posts aren’t getting many comments. Sometimes it’s a comment or two. Sometimes none. Occasionally, it seems Lady Luck smiles upon you and you get a few of your readers to share their thoughts.

But never dozens or hundreds of comments like some of the other blogs out there.

Maybe it’s all about luck, maybe there’s some trick, some tactic, and you can’t help but wonder…

Am I doing something wrong?

What can I do to get more comments?

Well, first of all, it’s not magic. Or trickery. Secondly, let’s see if we can do something about it.

In order to get more comments, one must understand how they work.

Well, there are two main factors that come into play.

[AoB] Most Blogs Fail. Why?

At least once a year someone out there publishes a long article announcing the imminent demise of the blog. More bloggers than ever are giving up, content saturation is alienating a lot of readers, and the rise in popularity of different mediums will be the final nail in the coffin.

The truth?

It’s always been like this.

Out of all the bloggers I’ve networked with when I launched my first blog in 2012, only a dozen or so still publish regularly.

Out of all the bloggers that I’ve personally coached, only a dozen or so still publish regularly.

And out of all the people who decide to start a blog this year, only a small percentage of them will still publish new content regularly by the end of the year.

But why?

[AoB] 7 Unconventional Questions That Will Change Your Blogging Game

As the cliché goes, if you want better answers, you should ask better questions.

The right questions at the right time can help you become aware of your mistakes, adjust your strategy, and begin your journey towards the blogging stratosphere.

No, seriously. The right questions at the right time…

Okay, let’s stop fooling around.

Here’s me asking you 7 questions that just might point you in the right direction.

And you know that the right question at the right time…

[AoB] How to Lose Friends and Alienate People (as a Blogger)

If there’s one thing I’m quite the expert on, that’s alienating a large, engaged audience.

Seriously.

I started my first blog back in April 2012. By November the same year, I had over twenty thousand readers. I was earning about $100 every single day, and my articles were read by close to a thousand people within the first 3–4 hours of an article being published.

Somehow, in my quest to increase my numbers, both in terms of readers and income, I lost friends and alienated a lot of people.

Just take a look at this statistic:

Here’s how you can do it as well in a couple easy to follow steps.

[AoB] Who Else is Struggling to Come Up With Ideas for Blog Posts?

Writer’s block.

The most dreaded words in all existence by creatives.

Also known as creative bankruptcy, writer’s block is all about a single four-letter word. One that we rarely even want to mention.

It’s an “F word” that is frowned upon by people from all areas of life. And this word is keeping you from writing, editing, formatting, and publishing your next blog post.

Solitude and Creative Expression

“Solitude or working alone can help a creative person develop and refine their work, but it is certainly not the only way to nourish creative projects,” so states Douglas Eby in his new book. Well, to each his own. Some creatives prefer isolation while others seem to strive amidst a collective. Both environs serve a purpose. It depends, I think, on how you’re wired.

Many artists acknowledge the value of academies such as Juilliard, and less formal artist retreats and workshops, like Idyllwild. Others give credit to formal education at a university’s marketing and communications school or a structured curriculum at, say, the International Center for Studies in Creativity.

Eby points out that much of the writing and advice on creative expression and enhancing creativity focuses on the inner journey of the individual. Furthermore, creating happens in a social context, and often depends on inspiration and support from others, on finding an audience, and getting financing from publishers and producers.

Perhaps, I say, but not always…