[AoB] How to Lose Friends and Alienate People (as a Blogger)

If there’s one thing I’m quite the expert on, that’s alienating a large, engaged audience.

Seriously.

I started my first blog back in April 2012. By November the same year, I had over twenty thousand readers. I was earning about $100 every single day, and my articles were read by close to a thousand people within the first 3–4 hours of an article being published.

Somehow, in my quest to increase my numbers, both in terms of readers and income, I lost friends and alienated a lot of people.

Just take a look at this statistic:

Here’s how you can do it as well in a couple easy to follow steps.

[AoB] Who Else is Struggling to Come Up With Ideas for Blog Posts?

Writer’s block.

The most dreaded words in all existence by creatives.

Also known as creative bankruptcy, writer’s block is all about a single four-letter word. One that we rarely even want to mention.

It’s an “F word” that is frowned upon by people from all areas of life. And this word is keeping you from writing, editing, formatting, and publishing your next blog post.

Solitude and Creative Expression

“Solitude or working alone can help a creative person develop and refine their work, but it is certainly not the only way to nourish creative projects,” so states Douglas Eby in his new book. Well, to each his own. Some creatives prefer isolation while others seem to strive amidst a collective. Both environs serve a purpose. It depends, I think, on how you’re wired.

Many artists acknowledge the value of academies such as Juilliard, and less formal artist retreats and workshops, like Idyllwild. Others give credit to formal education at a university’s marketing and communications school or a structured curriculum at, say, the International Center for Studies in Creativity.

Eby points out that much of the writing and advice on creative expression and enhancing creativity focuses on the inner journey of the individual. Furthermore, creating happens in a social context, and often depends on inspiration and support from others, on finding an audience, and getting financing from publishers and producers.

Perhaps, I say, but not always…

[AoB] 90 Super Easy Tips That Will Turn Even a Novice Blogger into an Expert

It’s not pleasant being the new guy. There’s always a bit of discomfort, a bit of friction when starting something new.

And the truth is that, most times, the advice that is out there on the web is kind of confusing.

Which advice do you follow?

That’s why I am going to offer you some real simple tips. Ninety of them.

Super easy. Super cool. Super useful. Especially if you’re a novice, struggling with readers, with staying consistent, with everything.

[AoB] 99 Percent of Bloggers Aren’t Aware of This Simple Rule

There’s this fascinating story about Pablo Picasso being able to produce a work of art in a few minutes.

Apparently, a woman once asked Picasso (who was either at a café or in a market) to do a drawing for her.

Picasso did what she asked, and then demanded some ridiculously high amount of money. Let’s say ten thousand dollars.

Of course, the woman protested, “But it only took you a couple of minutes to draw this.”

The old master corrected her, “It took me thirty years to learn how to draw this in a couple of minutes.”

Or so the story goes.

I’d like to use this story as a framework to discuss an often overlooked aspect of content creation.

It’s not just the skill, but also how that skill is perceived by others.

Blogging success is not just about years and years of practice, but about having an audience that’s aware of all those years of practice.

Let’s talk about the concept of social proof and how you can best use it to your advantage.

[AoB] Can You Still Make It as a Blogger in 2021?

On the 22th of April, 2012, I signed up for a WordPress.com account. The same day I wrote and published my first blog post.

I didn’t know how to write an article, what a headline was, or how to properly format a blog post. I didn’t know who my ideal reader was, I wasn’t sure of my niche or main topic, I didn’t have any social media accounts, and I didn’t have any money.

It took me a month to purchase my first domain name, and for a long time that was the only money I invested in my blog.

I didn’t know how to write an introduction, how to make my content engaging, or how to add value to my readers. In fact, I didn’t even know about many of the principles of blogging I learned along the way.

All I knew was that I needed an audience. And I just wanted to blog. And I knew that I wouldn’t give up, no matter what.

[AoB] The Zen Concept That Made Me Fall in Love With Blogging Again

Two and a half years ago I was just about ready to quit blogging.

First, because I thought there was nothing new to learn. I knew it all, I had reached the top of the mountain, and there was nowhere else to go from there.

Second, because I didn’t get much pleasure out of writing articles anymore. It was not challenging me anymore.

It was a rough time for me, considering that my income was a direct result of my ability to consistently produce new content.

I believe that…

[AoB] 100 Quick Tips From Someone Who Built an Audience of Over 200,000 Readers

I remember blogging hell. The 0 attached to most of my blog posts. Zero comments, zero likes. No shares.

I remember clicking the publish button as if to send my articles to die an undignified death.

I also remember the effort it took to go from 0 to 100 readers: taking massive action when networking, commenting on dozens of different blog posts daily, replying to every single comment.

I remember who it all felt unfair somehow. How it felt like a battle that I could never win.

Learned a lot during my nine years of blogging. I also figured out that the most important aspects of blogging are some of the least talked about, which is why I am sharing these lessons with you today.

[AoB] 25 Books Every Blogger Should Read

Oscar Wilde once said that, “Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.”

There’s a lot of truth in that statement, and I do strenuously believe that we must experience blogging ourselves, try and fail and develop our own frameworks and strategies, but at the same time we must understand that someone else’s rules can also help us on our journey.

There are no maps to guide us, but some of these books may point you in the right direction.

Here is a compilation of 25 books about writing well, marketing, and building an audience.

[AoB] Trends #6: The Polymathic Approach

The general advice when deciding on a niche for your blog is this: being as specific as possible will help you cater to your target audience.

The more specific you are, the more you will attract a small number of people.

That sounds about right…

But at the same time, here’s the paradox: the more specific you are, the less capable you are of creating content that stands out from the crowd.

What’s going on here?